The Hancock-Henderson Quill, Inc.


The 1921 Graphic

Compiled and Edited by Virginia Ross

Stronghurst Graphic:, June 2, 1921 

HONOR DEFENDERS: May 10th was marked by the general suspension of business and labor in this community while the thoughts of the citizens were turned toward the remembrance of those who in the various conflicts through which the country has passed, stood in the breech and defended the nation, flag and states.

Public Memorial services were held at the Lyric Theatre beginning with a half hour preceding the meeting of a fife and drum corps composed of Eruie Apt, W. L. Spiker and son Ernest stirring the patriotic blood of the gathering audience with some spirited martial music. By the time the hour set for the meeting had arrived, an audience had gathered. Rev. V. A. Crumbaker, chairman of the day called the meeting to order and all were invited to join in singing the national anthem. The divine blessing was invoked by Rev. K. R. Anderson and Mrs. Sterling Simpson sang Keisler's Cradle Song, Robert W. Service read the poem "Young Fellow My Lad" by Robert Mathers, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. James Mathers. Mrs. George Widney then sang, "In Flanders Field." The speaker of the day was Rev. W. C. Williamson, D.D. of Monmouth, Ill He is a veteran of the Civil War and has long since passed the Biblical limit of three score and then year in his life, but the vigor and spirit which characterized the younger soldier of the sixties is still apparent in his speech and action.

Following this address Miss Alice Wax sang Carrie Jacob Bonds adaptation of "A Perfect Day." This concluded the exercises at the theatre. The school children who were to carry the garlands and flags to the cemetery for decorating the soldiers' graves and who had been seated in a body near the platform marched out followed by the remainder of the audience.

On the street outside the procession to the cemetery formed under the direction of Mr. A. S. McElhinney, who had been selected as marshal, the children, autos and citizens on foot for the line of march. At the cemetery a number of recitations and drills by the children under the direction of Miss Mary Morgan and Juliette Wheeling were given. Comrade H. M. Allison then read the roll of honor containing the names of soldiers from this vicinity who had passed away and whose remains lie in the local cemetery or in graves on foreign soil. The wreathes and flags were then placed on the graves and the sounding of "taps" by two buglers closed the ceremonies and the crowd quietly dispersed.

While all of the exercises were of fitting and appropriate nature, it was a matter of regret to those in charge that more flowers had not been donated by the public for placing on soldiers' graves. That the neglect was due to thoughtlessness of what was due to the memory of those in whose honor the day was celebrated rather than to a lack of flowers was made evident by the fact that many floral tokens had been placed by friends upon the graves of those who were not soldiers. It would seem that in cases of this kind, the passage of scripture would apply which says: "This ought ye to have done; but not have left the other undone." (At this time Memorial Day was to honor soldiers, not family.)

Ad for Milk: Hereafter I will deliver milk to my patrons at the price formerly charged at my home. I am also prepared to furnish milk in quantities to parties desiring to make ice cream if notified on the day previous-Mrs. Wm. Kane

SALE OF SCHOOL HOUSE: The old school house in district No. 32 known as the "Heisler District" will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder on the school lot on June 15th-by Order of Township Trustees.

Ad by T. C. Knutstrom detailing price of new Buick six-cylinder models beginning June 1st f.o.b. factories, Flint, Michigan

Model Price 2011 price

3-passenger roadster $1495 $17,776

5-passenger touring 1525 18,132

3-passenger coupe 2135 25,385

5-passenger sedan 2435 28,952

7-passenger sedan 2635 31,330

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES: The crowning event marking the closing of the work in the Stronghurst High School saw a class of 24 seniors, the largest ever, graduate from this institution. They were handed their diplomas after listening to excellent advice from President McConaughy of Knox College as to the attitudes which they should take toward life as they passed "Out of the Harbor into the Deep." (list of graduates follows;check out article on microfilm at Henderson County Public Library.)

While Miss Doris Dixson played a processional these 24 graduates filed up the aisle of the church and took their places on the platform. Rev. Crumbaker made the invocation and was followed by a solo by Mrs. Sterling Simpson. Supt. Larson then announced that Miss Evelyn Hartquist and Miss Marjorie McKeown had been very close contestants for the class honors, the former having received a marking of 94 and the latter 93 8/10. In accordance, Miss Hartquist was class valedictorian with Miss McKeown as salutatorian. Following their addresses to classmates and the audience, Dr. McConaughty delivered a most excellent address full of sound wisdom and many suggestions applicable not only to student life but to life in general. A vocal duel by Miss Francis Worley and Mr. Douglass Prescott and the benediction by Rev. K. R. Anderson closed the exercises.

1896 Graphic: Decoration Day was held the first time in village history. Attorney R. F. Robinson and J. W. Gordon spoke at the occasion. The work on filling the big ravine spanned by a tree line just west of the village was begun by the Santa Fe Railroad. The marriage of James Wilson and Miss Lizzie Gibb occurred at the home of the bride's parents south of Biggsville on May 26th. R. B. Chase and the Cooksie brothers of Stronghurst had purchased phonographs and started on an entertainment tour of surrounding towns opening at Carman. Mrs. Lena Jones, wife of I.N. Jones of this place, passed away on May 29th after an extended illness.

BIGGSVILLE BRIEFS: Mr. and Mrs. Dave McDill returned from Oklahoma where they had gone for the benefit of Mr. McDill's health; the gentleman still remains in a bad condition. Mr. John Weir and son Ted completed a new garage on the property of Gus Erickson, who recently purchased a new Overland sedan. Lawrence Griffth expects to move with his family from the Alvah Martin property to the Sam Holmes residence. Medames McHenry and Erwin returned from Chicago where they attended the state convention of the Women's Federation. Biggsville people are having a nice breathing spell while there is no dust in the air. Some of the roads were heavily oiled last week while some of the main traveled streets received scarcely enough to keep down the dust until the last of June. Community Chautauqua begins June 19th with "The Sign of the Cross."

CARMAN CONCERNS: Rain is needed badly in this locality; gardens and hay are suffering from the drought. The measles quarantine cards have mostly been taken down. Many picnic parties have been enjoyed at the club houses and river and timber. Mr. Henry Adair and sister, Miss Martha and Mrs. Lib Vaughan of Stronghurst and Mrs. Emma Price of Burlington called at the Wm. Finch home. A little daughter which has been named Margaret Elaine, arrived on May 5th to make her home with Mr. and Mrs. William Pendry, Jr.; mother and daughter are doing fine. Many friends of Marion Bradway were saddened by receiving word of his death at Meriden, Miss. His body was laid to rest after funeral services conducted by Rev. Barr King. A very large attendance of the I.O.O.F. members was present and conducted their funeral rites. Pall bearers were Archie Vaughan, Harry Wisbey, Clarence Vaughan, Earl Marsden, John Dowell and Henry Jones.

GLADSTONE GLEANINGS: S. E. Duncan shipped several car loads of stock to Chicago and accompanied the shipment to the city. After visiting relatives and friends, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Lewis and children have started home from Iron Mountain, Mich.; they will make the trip by car. At the ball game with Oquawka, the score favored Oquawka 3 to 1.

WEDDING BELLS: The many friends of Dale Davis and Madge Henderson were surprise to learn that they had quietly slipped away to Burlington and had been united in the bonds of wedlock by Rev. Mr. Cutilipp, pastor of the M. E. Church Tuesday.

Following their marriage, they returned to Stronghurst and were present at a supper given by the ladies in the Community club rooms early in the evening where they formed part of a company of young people prominent in the social circles of the community who had reserved a special table for them. Later the party repaired to the new country home of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lynch north of Raritan where a home warming party was held. After the party had been in progress for some time, the noise of a motor car which seemed to be leaving was heard. None of the guests had been seen departing; but a check revealed that Dale and Madge were missing. Mrs. Henderson, the mother of the latter, was one of the guests at the Lynch home and from her it was learned that the two young people had been married during the afternoon and they were starting on their wedding journey. A pursuit was hastily planned, by when they reached their cars and attempted to start them, it was found that the switch keys had been removed and by the time these were located, the high power speedster which Dale operates was roaring down the road at a speed which convinced the would be pursuers that a chase would prove futile. It is presumed that the newly wedded pair motored to some railroad point and took a train for Chicago to spend their honeymoon. It is also not improbable that Dale's old associates will hold him to strict accountability for the trick he played on them when he and his bride return.

The bride and groom are numbered amongst the community's best known and most popular young people. The bride is the only daughter of Dr. and Mrs. F. M. Henderson of Stronghurst and is a lady of many accomplishments and possessed of a fine talent for dispensing pleasure in her association with others. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Davis of the Decorra neighborhood and is a well known and successful young farmer whose sunny temperament and likable qualities have made him a host of friends. They will make their future home on the groom's farm near Decorra.

OPENED TO THE PUBLIC: The newly completed Mausoleum in the local cemetery was visited by many people on Memorial Day. The remains of Jas. Pogue of Media were the first to be placed in the structure on May 9th. Since that time some 25 bodies have been lifted from the adjoining burying ground and placed therein, this number includes one soldier of the world war.

Stronghurst justly has reason to feel proud of this structure which equals that of any city in Western Illinois, the interior being finished in beautiful white marble. "Hope Abby" adds much to the beauty of the city of the dead. A drive way has been laid out around the outer part of the grounds and interested parties have some extensive plans for future improvements.

HARTERS RETURN HOME: Dr. and Mrs. I. F. Harter, who spent the past five months in California, have returned to their home here. Mrs. Harter arrived early while Dr. Harter stopped off at Topeka, Kans. While in the land of sunshine and flowers, the Harters were domiciled in a little rose covered bungalow in Hollywood surrounded with fruit ladened trees, some of the products of which they brought home with them.

While a large share of the time they spent there was devoted to sight seeing and recreation, the doctor found time to give a limited number of patients the benefit of his professional services. The home was also the scene of a number of social gathering in which former Illinoisans now living in California enjoyed the hospitality of the doctor and his wife.

WIN ALL THE TROPHIES: The athletic team of the Stronghurst High School went to Monmouth and participated in the invitation meet held under the auspices of the Monmouth College Y.M.C.A. They returned in the evening with three trophies of the contest, namely, the loving cup awarded to the team winning the meet; the cup awarded the team winning the relay race, and the cup presented to the individual athlete winning the highest number of points. The latter prize went to James Sanderson who had a total of 16 point to his credit at the close of the meet, having won first in the shot put and low hurdles, second in the discus and running high jump, and typing for third in the running broad jump.

The total number of points won by the Stronghurst boys was 33 _ points made by all but 4 were made by Sanderson and D. Putney, the latter winning the 100 and 200 yard dashes and finishing second in the 50. Virgil Putney was second in the shot put and third in the discus, winning 4 points for his school. In the relay race, the big lead obtained by Putney in the first lap was never overcome and the Stronghurst team easily landed first with the Monmouth team as their closest competitor.

BURNED BY LIGHTNING: During the severe electrical storm which prevailed in this locality last evening, the barn on the J. R. Carothers place northwest of town was struck by a bolt of lightning and burned to the ground. About 12 _ tons of hay, a small amount of grain, some farm implements and harness were consumed with the building, the fire having gained such headway before it was discovered that it was impossible to save any of the contents.

By the strenuous efforts of Mr. Carothers and a few neighbors, the fire was prevented from spreading to the adjoining out buildings. Mr. Carothers carried about $1,225 insurance on the barn and contents, which will only partially cover the loss sustained. The insurance was carried by the Farmers' Mutual Company and prompt and satisfactory settlement of the loss was made by the officials of the company within 12 hours after the fire occurred.

A CLOSE CALL: A serious fire was narrowly averted at the O. A. Rankin home north of town May 16th. A gasoline stove in the kitchen exploded and scattered the burning fuel about the room, which was quickly in flames. Mrs. Rankin, who was alone in the house, had the presence of mind to close the outer doors and windows and thus prevent a draft from fanning the blaze. Lyman Ross, who happened to be passing at the time, rushed into the house and he and Mrs. Rankin succeeded in beating out the flames. While no great amount of damage was done by the fire, the interior of both the kitchen and dining room was blistered by the heat and the walls badly discolored by the dense smoke which originated from the fire.

JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET: The banquet tendered the senior class of the high school by the juniors last Friday evening in the U.P. church dining rooms was a brilliant and successful social event. A delicious four course menu was served by Mrs. Johanna Wheeling, cateress, and this was followed by a good program of toasts and music. The room was tastefully decorated in pink and white and a large candelabrum containing colored candles adorned the table. The members of the two classes with the teachers, who were specially invited guests, made the most of this their last opportunity for mingling together in a social way previous to commencement.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: Miss Esther Nelson, who leaves for Chicago, was given a farewell reception by Miss Esther Enwall at the Carl Jacobson home east of town. At a recent meeting of the Board of Education of the Stronghurst Community High School, Mr. Carl Larson was re-employed as superintendent of the school and his sister, Miss Maree Larson, was also re-employed for another year of work in the high school. Under the auspices of Miss Lucretia Bruen the dinner given at the community Room was one of the pleasant social events of the season. Miss Ellen Hartquist of Chicago is a guest at the Wm. Hartquist home. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Ross are the happy parents of a fine 8 _ lb. daughter born to them at the Burlington Hospital on June 1st. Roland Davidson and bride took their departure for their home in Buffalo, N.Y. William Connor, a prominent and well to-do farmer of the country south of Raritan suffered a stroke of apoplexy from which he died on May 27th at the age of 76 years.

The condition of Mrs. Joe Wilcox is very serious; she is being attended by a trained nurse and the children are being cared for at the home of her sister, Mrs. McCannon in Burlington. The flower boxes in front of the Rest Room and Library have been filled with blooming plants; Mrs. Freeman Doak and Mrs. Chas. Marshall furnished the plants and arranged them. Jim Anderson, formerly manager of the Stronghurst Grain and Mdse. Co. is now publicity man for the Rosenbaum grain commission firm of Chicago. Workmen are redecorating the interior of the Harter apartments and pharmacy.

Mrs. Bert Putney is quite ill and her mother, Mrs. McIntyre, who has been with her for some time, is now staying at the home of her other daughter, Mrs. N. B. Curry.

The auto repair firm of McCartney & Willard of Raritan has been dissolved. Mr. McCartney is taking up the work at Smithshire while Mr. Willard will continue the business in Raritan. The auto repair firm of Burg & Wood who operated at the Knutstrom garage, have retired, Mr. Burg being retained by the Knutstrom Co. and Mr. Wood entering the employ of the Johnson Garage. A draw bar on a freight car in a west bound train pulled out while the train was passing through the local yards and the car was derailed a short distance west of the Broadway crossing. West bound traffic was delayed several hours by the accident, the wrecker from Fort Madison getting the wreck cleaned up during the afternoon.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: C. F. Dale, a representative of Vincennes Products Co. of Vincennes, Ind., has been looking over prospecting fields in this vicinity. County Advisor and Mrs. F.M. Bane are rejoicing over the arrival of a 10 lb. daughter on May 24th; the little miss will be known as Shirley Rose. Harold and Lyle Waymack of the U. S. Navy are visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Waymack at Raritan; they were mingling with the crowd on the street Saturday evening. Mr. and Mrs. W.J. McElhinney entertained relatives at a 12 o'clock dinner; the guests were Mr. and Mrs. James Amerman of Alpha, Ill.; Mrs Katherine Johnson, Wilbur Johnson and Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Steele of Abingdon; Mrs. Sarah French and Fleming French of Bluffton, Ind. The M. E. Church of the village is in the hands of interior decorators this week.

MOVED TO BURLINGTON: James Sutliff and family moved to Burlington, Ia. and will hereafter make their home at 1616 Bluff Street in that city. Mr. Sutliff will be in the employ of The Leonard Schell Oil Co. which has a branch there.

Since coming to Stronghurst several years ago this family has taken an active interest in the village and community affairs and Mr. Sutliff has been prominently identified with the business interests of the village as well as with its municipal affairs.

Last Monday evening some 15-20 neighbors and friends of the family gathered at their home to express their regrets over their departure. The coming of guests was unannounced, but this fact did not distract from the spirit of the occasion. Refreshments were served and a pleasant social time enjoyed by all.

IMPORTANT CHURCH GATHERING HERE: On Thursday and Friday of next week, the 40th annual convention of the Monmouth Presbyterial Women's Missionary Society will be held in the United Presbyterian Church here. The program will be one of unusual interest and the local committee is planning for the entertainment of a large number of delegates from the churches composing Monmouth Presbytery.

SUFFERED PARALYTIC STROKE: Mrs. Jay H. Foote suffered a paralytic stroke at her home in the north part of town and is reported to be in a critical condition. Her sister is here from Ottawa, Kan. and also her sister-in-law, Mrs. F. Livingston of Fort Madison, Iowa. The two daughters, Laura and Mrs. Ruth Little, who live in Chicago, arrived here on Tuesday.

***OBITUARY***MRS. AGNES GILLILAND: Agnes Stevenson Gilliland was born in County Antrim, Ireland, July 28, 1840 and passed away June 2, 1921, aged 80 years, 10 months and 5 days. She was the fourth daughter of John S. and Elizabeth Stevenson. On Dec. 16, 1865 she united in marriage to William Gilliland who died on Feb. 6, 1920. To this union six children were born, three of whom survive their parents: John Gilliland of Stronghurst; David Gilliland of Media and Mrs. Pearl Drain of Terre Haute. Nine grandchildren and one great grand child also survive.

Mrs. Gilliland came to this country with her husband in 1868 and settled in the Biggsville neighborhood. Henderson County has been the family home ever since with the exception of two years spent in the neighboring commonwealth of Iowa.

Many years ago Mrs. Gilliland united with the United Presbyterian Church at Biggsville, later transferring her membership to the U. P. Church in Media when the family moved to that neighborhood. Mrs. Gilliland was one of the early members of the Biggsville congregation and community, the ranks of which are fast being thinned by death.

During the past few year Mrs. Gilliland has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Drain, and during much of that time has suffered from the infirmities of old age. About ten weeks ago it became necessary for her to take to her bed and although loving hands and hearts ministered to her every need, she gradually grew weaker till she peacefully fell asleep Thursday evening.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: The Dorcas Circle of the Lutheran church will hold a midsummer social Saturday evening June 18th at the Charles O'Gren home; ice cream and cake will be served. The Apt Brothers and Sister will serve ice cream and cake in the community rooms in Stronghurst on Saturday evening, June 11th; the price will be 25 cents with music a feature of the evening. Miss Merle Adair, who was one of the recent graduates of the Stronghurst High School this year, wrote the examination for a scholarship in the College of Liberal Arts in the University of Illinois in the office of the county superintendent of Schools at Oquawka. At the baseball game here with Gladstone the local team lost with a score of 8 to 9 in favor of Gladstone.

GLADSTONE GLEANINGS: The Gladstone second team were victorious over the Monmouth stone quarry boys by a score of 16 to 9; Clarence Cisna as been selected as manager. Clayton James and Elmer Pence who were in Chicago drove home in Elmer's fine new automobile bought there. Frank Jacob moved into the A. J. Ditto home in the west part of town. Mrs. Lucy Wilds has bought the home of Mr. and Mrs. G.H. Tribler and will soon move here from Keithsburg. Rolf Miller and family returned from Indianapolis after attending the auto races.

1896 GRAPHIC: Judge Botkins of Hutchinson, Kans. gave an address on the subject of temperance at the United Presbyterian Church on the evening of June 10th. It was described as being one of the most original and beneficial of the kind ever delivered here. During a storm lightning killed three fine steers belonging to C.E. Peasley. A total of 100,000 bushels of corn had been bought in Stronghurst, Media, Carman and Lomax by the Moirs of Oquawka and was being held in storage. Miss Florence Dobbin left for Valparaiso, Ind. to attend summer school. Miss Hattie Evans of Hopper and James Pendry of Carman were married in Burlington on June 9th. Reports published showed the total resources of the Stronghurst State Band to be $147, 071 and those of the State Bank of Henderson County to be $63,093. Scott Jackson was awaiting execution at Newport Ky. for the murder Pearl Bryan.

BIGGSVILLE BRIEFS: Miss Dorothy Millen returned home after a visit at the Arthur McIntyre home. Miss Lizzie McKinley is confined to her bed again with sickness. Miss Margie McIntosh arrived home from Washington, D.C. where she has been engaged in work ever since war times. Mrs. Wheatley and children left for Arkansas where they will spend the summer with her people. The play, "Bird Haven" is to be given at the high school on Thursday evening.

Rev. Baker, the new minister of the Presbyterian Church, and his family arrived here last Saturday. The Country Club and community Club held an ice cream supper on the lawn of the Presbyterian Church clearing almost $30; this money is to be used to help pay the expenses for the local Chautauqua. Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Martin and daughter Margaret, Misses Emma Folmer and Virginia Norris attended the play, "Robinhood," in Galesburg given on the Lombard campus by the college students. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Whitman attended the baccalaureate services for the seniors of the Western Illinois Teacher College at Macomb, their daughter, Miss Louise, being a member of the class. A birthday party for Lela and Lois Kilgore, little daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kilgore, was attended by ten little people. Games of various kinds were played and refreshments of ice cream and cake were served. Chas. Gilliland moved his family from the Walter Kilgore property north of town into the Alvah Martin residence.

CARMAN CONCERNS: Miss Anna Connell of Elkader, Ia. was a business caller in town. Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Morrison now occupy the Huppert property. Ben Wisbey of Chillicothe is recovering from an operation for tonsillitis at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Wisbey. Lew Bagles, our liveryman, is sporting a fine new Ford-Henry Jones having purchased his old one. Ed Ahlers of Carthage has returned home after being the supply man at the "Q" depot. Fred Crane's familiar face as agent is again in evidence. Mr. and Mrs. A. Rebel of Chariton, Iowa are visiting at the Thos. Dixon home and with other relatives. LaVerne Anderson of Dayton, Texas is visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Dowell.

LOMAX LINGERINGS: Mrs. Minnie Anderson of Kansas City if visiting at the home of her brother, James Hedge and family. F. J. Walling left for Chicago on a business trip in the interest of the Lomax Boiler Co. The small son of Gid Worley and wife, who was taken to the Burlington hospital and operated on for appendicitis, is getting along as well as could be expected. Mrs. A. R. Rice, who has been sick for several weeks at the home of her daughter, Mrs. I. P. Bowlin, passed away Friday with the funeral held at Dallas City on Sunday afternoon. Prof. L. E. Foote left for southern Illinois to work for the Standard Education Society. Thos. Howard of the south country has purchased the Effenbeck property and will move there in the near future.

CLOSES TERM AT MAPLE GROVE: Miss Emma Wright closed her school at Maple Grove with the annual basket dinner and picnic. In past years the crowd has been composed chiefly of the mothers and children, but this year most of the fathers left their work and enjoyed the holiday with the others. After dinner, the crowd was entertained with two little operettas given by the children-primary grade and older children.

This closes Miss Wright's third successful year of teaching at Maple Grove. Her unusual success has surely been due to her splendid teaching, her untiring efforts and her conscientious interest in every pupil in the school. (Isn't that a glowing assessment of a teacher!)

BRIDAL SHOWER: A very pleasant social afternoon was enjoyed by some 15 young ladies at the beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Park of the east country at which Miss Marjorie Gibb, who is to be a June bride, was the guest of honor. The house was tastefully decorated in yellow and white and in the dining room a large umbrella was suspended over a table on which a number of handsome gifts were placed. The guests were given envelopes containing crepe paper and were asked to compete in the making of a suitable trousseau for the bride. The first prize, an incense burner, was awarded to Mrs. Mabel Sanderson while the "booby" prize of a pair of clothes pins went to Miss Madeline Lovitt. Dainty refreshments of angel food cake, tut-i-fruit salad, ice cream and punch were served. The Misses Juliette Wheeling, Opal Stine and Madeline Park were hostesses.

AUTO RACES AND FLYING CIRCUS AT GALESBURG: What gives the promise of being the most spectacular show of the sort given in Western Illinois in years will be staged at the District Fair Grounds in Galesburg on June 11th at 2:30 pm when championship automobile races and Ruth Law's Flying Circus will be presented for popular approval of racing and aviation fans. On the program are six automobile races in which men rated as the best dirt track drivers in the world will go after track and world records and in which purses amounting to $3,000 ($35, 670 in today's money) will be hung up. (Long list of drivers and their cars included in this article-read it on microfilm at Henderson County Public Library.)

In addition there will be two aviation events, both of which are entirely new to the people of this vicinity. One will be the changing from a racing automobile on a circular track to an aeroplane in flight, both machines traveling at the rate of ninety miles an hour. This will be done by Louis James, the young Chicago dare devil, who stands on the back of Soule's racer and grasps a rope ladder dangling under the wings of Lieut. Verne Treat's aeroplane and scrambles aboard the aeroplane. James does many other aerial acrobatic stunts, hanging by his feet from the running gear of the plane or by his teeth from the end of a long rope while the plane does stunts in the air.

The supreme stunt that Ruth Law herself performs is to stand on an aeroplane while her pilot loops the loop. Miss Law has been flying since 1912 and holds all world records for women aviators but previously has been content to fly while safely strapped to the seat of her plane. She is the first woman to attempt this dare devil stunt on an aeroplane.

****OBITUARY***ROY BERG: Roy S., third son of Carl and Carrie Berg, was born in Burlington, Ia. Aug. 8, 1905 and died at his home in Stronghurst June 7, 1921. His parents lived in Burlington until Roy was four years old when they moved to a farm near Stronghurst where they lived until 1911 when they moved to the village. All of his school days were spent in the Stronghurst schools where he gained many loyal playmates. He was also a member of Mrs. Dixson' class in the M. E. Sunday School, his classmates being chosen as pall bearers.

Until 14 months ago Roy was quite a rugged lad with the promise of a long life seemingly before him, but about this time he contracted a severe cold. No serious results were anticipated, but it seems that the dread disease which carries away so many of the human race was gradually fastening itself upon him. He was a hopeful lad and did his part in the struggle against the disease as long as he was able. Last August his mother took him to Albuquerque, New Mexico in the hope that the climate there would prove beneficial to his condition. After a three month's stay, he became so homesick that his mother thought it best to bring him back home. He seemed somewhat better for a time, but I soon became evident that the malady from which he suffered was gaining ground upon him. About April first of this year a rapid decline set in which ended in his passing away last Tuesday evening at about four o'clock.

His father, a sister, Hazel, 19 years of age, and a little brother, Cecil preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn his departure his mother; two brothers, Alphonso and Charles; two sisters, Marie and Margaret; a sister-in-law, Mrs. Nona Berg and a little nephew, Dickey Berg besides many friends and playmates. Funeral was conducted at the Stronghurst Christian Church with interment in the local cemetery.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: The junior and senior class enjoyed a picnic at Crapo Park. Dr. I. F. Harter was seen driving his car which had been in storage in Monmouth. Miss Lois Shaw, who was one of this year's graduates from Stronghurst High School, has been employed as teacher of the Dutch Row School in Biggsville Township for the coming year. The stork left a young son at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Stine; the young man will bear the name Wallace Weber. Glenn Marshall has finished his studies at the Gem City Business College and is presently at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. A. Marshall, north of Stronghurst. Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Gibb of Media Township announced the coming marriage of their daughter, Miss Marjorie, to Mr. Estel Mudd which will occur on June 15th. Miss Icle Rezner has been engaged to teach the Gearheart School southeast of Raritan next year. Mr. Dale Davis and bride returned from their honeymoon trip to Chicago. Miss Loretta Schenck, a teacher in the public schools of Pueblo, Colo. will spend her summer vacation with relatives in Raritan.

Paul Bell, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Bell has been going about on crutches for several days on account of having the misfortune of stepping on a rusty nail which penetrated his foot an inch or more and surgical attention was necessary. Rev. C. D. Wiesman of Hope College, Mich. has assumed the pastorate of the Raritan Reformed Church for the summer. Rev. Mr. Mueller, a graduate of the class of 1921 of Hope College, has accepted a call to become the regular pastor and will begin his labors on Sept. 1st. Rev. Chas. Fisher, evangelist, is holding a series of meetings at the South Prairie M. E. Church, five miles east and one mile south of Stronghurst. This is one of the pioneer churches of Henderson County and at one time had a strong organization but like many other country churches in recent times, has practically ceased to function.

Earl Beaver, who is connected with the Detroit, Mich. branch of the well known Capper & Capper firm of men's furnishers, visited his father, A. L. Beaver. Earl is in affluent circumstances now and drives a fine Pierce-Arrow car. He drove from Detroit to Indianapolis and attended the big auto races there and then came on to Stronghurst by way of Chicago. Homer Justice had a valuable horse killed by lightning in the June 1st storm. Mr. Wm Weir of Coloma is at home again after several months spent at a sanatorium at Springfield. (Sanaitorium could be a TB or cancer hospital.) Mrs. Sallie Woods is caring for Grandma Justice, who was badly injured by being thrown from a buggy a week ago at the home of her son Clarence. Wm. Connor, the well known farmer of the country south of Raritan, who died on May 26th, is reported to have left an estate valued at over $132,000. ($1,569,480 in today's values). All of the property is willed to his wife and daughters. Ten cars of livestock were shipped to Chicago from the local station: Frank Nelson-4 cars of cattle and 1 of hogs; C. E. Fort-1 car of hogs; C. G. Richey 1 car of sheep and Chas. Lind-3 cars of cattle. The marriage of Kenneth Gordon of Oquawka to a Miss McClellan of Aledo took place at the home of the bride's parents. The groom is the youngest son of County Judge Gordon; he will take his bride to Altoona, Pa. where he has employment.

The late frosts last spring had the effect of shortening the strawberry crop at Oak Grove Farm and the supply has not been anywhere sufficient to meet the demand as many customers have been turned away daily. Last Wednesday morning at least a dozen cars where at the patch whose owners were waiting for it to become light enough for them to pick the berries. Mrs. William Hartgrove, wife of the Oquawka Township supervisor, died at her home ear Oquawka early Monday morning. A car of road oil arrived in the village and arrangements are being made to have it applied. Judge J. W. Gordon is now an inmate of the Burlington Hospital as he was not making satisfactory recovery from his recent illness.

****OBITUARY***ROY BERG: Roy S., third son of Carl and Carrie Berg, was born in Burlington, Ia. Aug. 8, 1905 and died at his home in Stronghurst June 7, 1921. His parents lived in Burlington until Roy was four years old when they moved to a farm near Stronghurst where they lived until 1911 when they moved to the village. All of his school days were spent in the Stronghurst schools where he gained many loyal playmates. He was also a member of Mrs. Dixson' class in the M. E. Sunday School, his classmates being chosen as pall bearers.

Until 14 months ago Roy was quite a rugged lad with the promise of a long life seemingly before him, but about this time he contracted a severe cold. No serious results were anticipated, but it seems that the dread disease which carries away so many of the human race was gradually fastening itself upon him. He was a hopeful lad and did his part in the struggle against the disease as long as he was able. Last August his mother took him to Albuquerque, New Mexico in the hope that the climate there would prove beneficial to his condition. After a three month's stay, he became so homesick that his mother thought it best to bring him back home. He seemed somewhat better for a time, but I soon became evident that the malady from which he suffered was gaining ground upon him. About April first of this year a rapid decline set in which ended in his passing away last Tuesday evening at about four o'clock.

His father, a sister, Hazel, 19 years of age, and a little brother, Cecil preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn his departure his mother; two brothers, Alphonso and Charles; two sisters, Marie and Margaret; a sister-in-law, Mrs. Nona Berg and a little nephew, Dickey Berg besides many friends and playmates. Funeral was conducted at the Stronghurst Christian Church with interment in the local cemetery.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: The junior and senior class enjoyed a picnic at Crapo Park. Dr. I. F. Harter was seen driving his car which had been in storage in Monmouth. Miss Lois Shaw, who was one of this year's graduates from Stronghurst High School, has been employed as teacher of the Dutch Row School in Biggsville Township for the coming year. The stork left a young son at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Stine; the young man will bear the name Wallace Weber. Glenn Marshall has finished his studies at the Gem City Business College and is presently at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. A. Marshall, north of Stronghurst. Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Gibb of Media Township announced the coming marriage of their daughter, Miss Marjorie, to Mr. Estel Mudd which will occur on June 15th. Miss Icle Rezner has been engaged to teach the Gearheart School southeast of Raritan next year. Mr. Dale Davis and bride returned from their honeymoon trip to Chicago. Miss Loretta Schenck, a teacher in the public schools of Pueblo, Colo. will spend her summer vacation with relatives in Raritan.

Paul Bell, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Bell has been going about on crutches for several days on account of having the misfortune of stepping on a rusty nail which penetrated his foot an inch or more and surgical attention was necessary. Rev. C. D. Wiesman of Hope College, Mich. has assumed the pastorate of the Raritan Reformed Church for the summer. Rev. Mr. Mueller, a graduate of the class of 1921 of Hope College, has accepted a call to become the regular pastor and will begin his labors on Sept. 1st. Rev. Chas. Fisher, evangelist, is holding a series of meetings at the South Prairie M. E. Church, five miles east and one mile south of Stronghurst. This is one of the pioneer churches of Henderson County and at one time had a strong organization but like many other country churches in recent times, has practically ceased to function.

Earl Beaver, who is connected with the Detroit, Mich. branch of the well known Capper & Capper firm of men's furnishers, visited his father, A. L. Beaver. Earl is in affluent circumstances now and drives a fine Pierce-Arrow car. He drove from Detroit to Indianapolis and attended the big auto races there and then came on to Stronghurst by way of Chicago. Homer Justice had a valuable horse killed by lightning in the June 1st storm. Mr. Wm Weir of Coloma is at home again after several months spent at a sanatorium at Springfield. (Sanaitorium could be a TB or cancer hospital.) Mrs. Sallie Woods is caring for Grandma Justice, who was badly injured by being thrown from a buggy a week ago at the home of her son Clarence. Wm. Connor, the well known farmer of the country south of Raritan, who died on May 26th, is reported to have left an estate valued at over $132,000. ($1,569,480 in today's values). All of the property is willed to his wife and daughters. Ten cars of livestock were shipped to Chicago from the local station: Frank Nelson-4 cars of cattle and 1 of hogs; C. E. Fort-1 car of hogs; C. G. Richey 1 car of sheep and Chas. Lind-3 cars of cattle. The marriage of Kenneth Gordon of Oquawka to a Miss McClellan of Aledo took place at the home of the bride's parents. The groom is the youngest son of County Judge Gordon; he will take his bride to Altoona, Pa. where he has employment.

The late frosts last spring had the effect of shortening the strawberry crop at Oak Grove Farm and the supply has not been anywhere sufficient to meet the demand as many customers have been turned away daily. Last Wednesday morning at least a dozen cars where at the patch whose owners were waiting for it to become light enough for them to pick the berries. Mrs. William Hartgrove, wife of the Oquawka Township supervisor, died at her home ear Oquawka early Monday morning. A car of road oil arrived in the village and arrangements are being made to have it applied. Judge J. W. Gordon is now an inmate of the Burlington Hospital as he was not making satisfactory recovery from his recent illness.

****OBITUARY***ROY BERG: Roy S., third son of Carl and Carrie Berg, was born in Burlington, Ia. Aug. 8, 1905 and died at his home in Stronghurst June 7, 1921. His parents lived in Burlington until Roy was four years old when they moved to a farm near Stronghurst where they lived until 1911 when they moved to the village. All of his school days were spent in the Stronghurst schools where he gained many loyal playmates. He was also a member of Mrs. Dixson' class in the M. E. Sunday School, his classmates being chosen as pall bearers.

Until 14 months ago Roy was quite a rugged lad with the promise of a long life seemingly before him, but about this time he contracted a severe cold. No serious results were anticipated, but it seems that the dread disease which carries away so many of the human race was gradually fastening itself upon him. He was a hopeful lad and did his part in the struggle against the disease as long as he was able. Last August his mother took him to Albuquerque, New Mexico in the hope that the climate there would prove beneficial to his condition. After a three month's stay, he became so homesick that his mother thought it best to bring him back home. He seemed somewhat better for a time, but I soon became evident that the malady from which he suffered was gaining ground upon him. About April first of this year a rapid decline set in which ended in his passing away last Tuesday evening at about four o'clock.

His father, a sister, Hazel, 19 years of age, and a little brother, Cecil preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn his departure his mother; two brothers, Alphonso and Charles; two sisters, Marie and Margaret; a sister-in-law, Mrs. Nona Berg and a little nephew, Dickey Berg besides many friends and playmates. Funeral was conducted at the Stronghurst Christian Church with interment in the local cemetery.

LOCAL AND AREA NEWS: The junior and senior class enjoyed a picnic at Crapo Park. Dr. I. F. Harter was seen driving his car which had been in storage in Monmouth. Miss Lois Shaw, who was one of this year's graduates from Stronghurst High School, has been employed as teacher of the Dutch Row School in Biggsville Township for the coming year. The stork left a young son at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Stine; the young man will bear the name Wallace Weber. Glenn Marshall has finished his studies at the Gem City Business College and is presently at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. A. Marshall, north of Stronghurst. Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Gibb of Media Township announced the coming marriage of their daughter, Miss Marjorie, to Mr. Estel Mudd which will occur on June 15th. Miss Icle Rezner has been engaged to teach the Gearheart School southeast of Raritan next year. Mr. Dale Davis and bride returned from their honeymoon trip to Chicago. Miss Loretta Schenck, a teacher in the public schools of Pueblo, Colo. will spend her summer vacation with relatives in Raritan.

Paul Bell, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Bell has been going about on crutches for several days on account of having the misfortune of stepping on a rusty nail which penetrated his foot an inch or more and surgical attention was necessary. Rev. C. D. Wiesman of Hope College, Mich. has assumed the pastorate of the Raritan Reformed Church for the summer. Rev. Mr. Mueller, a graduate of the class of 1921 of Hope College, has accepted a call to become the regular pastor and will begin his labors on Sept. 1st. Rev. Chas. Fisher, evangelist, is holding a series of meetings at the South Prairie M. E. Church, five miles east and one mile south of Stronghurst. This is one of the pioneer churches of Henderson County and at one time had a strong organization but like many other country churches in recent times, has practically ceased to function.

Earl Beaver, who is connected with the Detroit, Mich. branch of the well known Capper & Capper firm of men's furnishers, visited his father, A. L. Beaver. Earl is in affluent circumstances now and drives a fine Pierce-Arrow car. He drove from Detroit to Indianapolis and attended the big auto races there and then came on to Stronghurst by way of Chicago. Homer Justice had a valuable horse killed by lightning in the June 1st storm. Mr. Wm Weir of Coloma is at home again after several months spent at a sanatorium at Springfield. (Sanaitorium could be a TB or cancer hospital.) Mrs. Sallie Woods is caring for Grandma Justice, who was badly injured by being thrown from a buggy a week ago at the home of her son Clarence. Wm. Connor, the well known farmer of the country south of Raritan, who died on May 26th, is reported to have left an estate valued at over $132,000. ($1,569,480 in today's values). All of the property is willed to his wife and daughters. Ten cars of livestock were shipped to Chicago from the local station: Frank Nelson-4 cars of cattle and 1 of hogs; C. E. Fort-1 car of hogs; C. G. Richey 1 car of sheep and Chas. Lind-3 cars of cattle. The marriage of Kenneth Gordon of Oquawka to a Miss McClellan of Aledo took place at the home of the bride's parents. The groom is the youngest son of County Judge Gordon; he will take his bride to Altoona, Pa. where he has employment.

The late frosts last spring had the effect of shortening the strawberry crop at Oak Grove Farm and the supply has not been anywhere sufficient to meet the demand as many customers have been turned away daily. Last Wednesday morning at least a dozen cars where at the patch whose owners were waiting for it to become light enough for them to pick the berries. Mrs. William Hartgrove, wife of the Oquawka Township supervisor, died at her home ear Oquawka early Monday morning. A car of road oil arrived in the village and arrangements are being made to have it applied. Judge J. W. Gordon is now an inmate of the Burlington Hospital as he was not making satisfactory recovery from his recent illness.